Wait, it’s the end of February?

That means I’m way past due for a check-in about various goings-on. For this post, I’ll avoid the toxic spill fire much of the world has become.
Ben and I have been studying HEMA, Historic European Martial Arts – in our case, medieval German longsword – since August. We’ve now graduated from the “Beginners” group at our club, the Mid-Atlantic Society for Historical Swordsmanship (MASHS), and train with our much more experienced fellow practitioners. It’s fair to say we’re reaching the phase in which we don’t suck all the time, though we’re still pretty rank newbies.
This has turned out to be incredibly fun for both of us, and not just because Ben gets to hit me in the head with a sword once a week. (We wear pretty substantial safety gear when we train: chest protectors, canvas tunics, fencing masks with back-of-the-head-covers, forearm protection, and heavy plastic-shell gloves.) It’s been a long time since I’ve attempted any martial arts training. 30 years, in fact! But there’s something incredible about learning to fight with swords. Our latest investment is a pair of Regenyei steel feders, or training swords. These are what we primarily train with now that we’ve moved into “beginning intermediate” status. I’ve also built a pell, a training target we can use at home – outside, anyway, as swinging a 4-foot sword inside the house isn’t practical.
On the writing front, I plowed through the third revision of The Frozen Past in November and December. This was a major revision involving a significant restructuring of the novel. The word count ultimately dropped by about 4k words, but due to the amount I cut, I wound up writing tens of thousands of new words. Some of these were entirely new scenes; others came from major re-writing of existing scenes. This draft was critiqued by the wonderful members of our newly-formed writing group, the “Maryland Space Opera Collective”, or MD-SPOC. One of my Viable Paradise classmates also read and critiqued it for me. I’m now into heavy revision mode, which looks a lot like drafting mode. This means I pretty much spend weekday evenings, much of Saturday, and part of Sunday either downstairs on my desktop or somewhere else, typically a Panera, hunched over a keyboard.
The third draft of The Frozen Past fixed the majority of the big issues, but there’s still a rather thorny set of problems with two characters in particular. Since these are my protagonist/PoV character, and one of his primary antagonists, that’s kind of a big deal. Getting enough information about the antagonist’s motivations and history into the book is proving tricky, and I’ve resorted to gender-flipping this character as a brain hack to help. This seems to be working; it’s letting me approach this person as if they were an entirely new character. This seems to be the biggest single problem remaining in the book.
Once I’m done fixing up the antagonist, my protagonist is next up for adjustment. One issue’s already been fixed in the text, though I need to touch up some later references to it. The other problem is that he seems not suspicious enough for some readers. I’m fixing that a couple of ways. One’s a little more indirect: certain events, Bad Things, actively look malicious right now. They’re going to be throttled back in their depiction so they appear less so – more accidental or coincidental. That should mean I don’t have to tweak the actual character as much.
While I have a punch list of other tweaks, nothing else seems to require as much careful handling as these two items. Time will tell if I’ve got that right! I’m basically a month behind where I wanted to be with this for various reasons, but with if I can put the work in, I think I can have my shoppable draft ready sometime in March.
After taking stock of various factors, Michelle and I decided to put aside our tentative plans to visit Helsinki and London this summer. This trip was intended to combine attending WorldCon 75 (Helsinki) and a celebration of our 25th anniversary. Instead, I’m going to be attending four science fiction conventions this year, with Michelle coming to two of them. May brings the Nebula Award weekend & conference in Pittsburgh, along with Balticon over Memorial Day weekend. In June I’m headed to Fourth Street Fantasy in Minneapolis, which is shaping up to be a reunion of sorts for Viable Paradise 20 folks. In July, Michelle and I will head to New England to celebrate our anniversary and cap that with attendance at ReaderCon in the Boston area.
There’s been a big uptick in political activism in the Appel household. I may say more about this later, but suffice to say that by the end of this week, every member of the household will have participated in at least one protest. At least three of us have our congressional reps on speed-dial, and we’ve lately added the Governor and other state & county officials to the list. We’re not neglecting snail-mail either.
Folks who know me well have likely noticed one big absence: gaming. I have put all the tabletop games I was running on hiatus – Traveller back before my surgery, with Honor + Intrigue and The One Ring going dark in November. While I’m going to be joining a weekly short-term exploratory game at Games & Stuff in March, it’s likely going to be a little while before I’m going to have the brain cycles to actually run another game. I’ve also pulled back from all the gaming conventions I’d been attending, though I’m going to continue to support the Charm City Game Day and hopefully TridentCon. I’ll need to get back into some kind of tabletop game… but won’t be thinking about that until after this revision is done.
I’ll be trying to post things more regularly here. Coming up later this week will be a quick review of some of my recent reading. Until then, be excellent to each other, and #resist.

Writing Update, August 2016 Edition

The last 12 months have seen a lot happen in my writing life. I finished the first draft of what I hope will be my first book, “The Frozen Past”, early last December. Along the way I learned a lot about what works for me in terms of writing process. (I do best with 2+ hour stints in a place that’s not my house.) I could also see my writing getting better as I went.

Not entirely coincidentally, completion of that manuscript coincided with the beginning of an “Open Door” period at Angry Robot books, a time during which they accepted unsolicited submissions. I sent it off with fairly realistic expectations, knowing I wouldn’t hear anything for months – the window didn’t close until the end of January 2016, and they expected to get hundreds of submissions.

They got over 1100.

I went for quite a while without hearing anything. I passed the manuscript around to a select few friends and family to read – my alpha readers – and got some good feedback. After giving it a few months, I started a revision pass in March that finished in April, which fixed a few of the more salient problems. I knew the beginning was too still too slow but tried a few things to fix that, with limited success. I sent it around again, including a few new folks, in early May, with a request to provide feedback by month’s end.

May saw a couple of developments. With my surgery date set for July I was free to attend Balticon, the big SF/F convention held annually over Memorial Day weekend, and the con suddenly added a set of writing workshops (for an additional fee). I signed up for two. I also got my expected rejection from Angry Robot. Since they were looking at the weakest part of the book, and the first draft at that, the rejection went down pretty easily. (I’ve taken a leaf from writer Tobias Buckell and stuck a print-out of the rejection e-mail in a binder.)

Feedback on the second draft started rolling in, and I trucked off to Balticon, which proved to be a significant event in a couple of ways.

The first few came during the initial workshop, on “Worldbuilding in a Hard SF Universe”, taught by Chuck Gannon. There were only three students counting myself and one turned out to be Beth Tanner, a friend (and friend of the family). During the session Chuck, Beth and our fellow student talked about our works and several key things about my setting crystallized for me on the spot. Chuck also brought up a couple things I absolutely hadn’t considered which make the background of the Exile Clusters more real, but also helped me find the key conflict going on in my little fictional universe. The session was well worth the $180 I spent on it.

The second thing happened over the course of the weekend while participating in the grand tradition of “Barcon”, i.e. the conversations between folks at the hotel bar during the convention. Beth asked if I had plans to submit my writing to any workshops, particularly the Viable Paradise workshop coming up in October. I’d thought about it, and had originally hoped to apply to the Taos Toolbox workshop run by Walter Jon Williams and Nancy Kress over the summer, but my surgery and the expense precluded that from this year. Beth kept at me through the weekend: “You’re at the level where this is the next step for you,” she told me on more than one occasion. “Just apply – you’ve got nothing to lose!”

So, after a week of wrangling with my synopsis and fixing up the beginning of “The Frozen Past” a bit more, I submitted the synopsis and first 8000 words. I also won a professional manuscript critique in a charity auction for “Con or Bust”, and sent the entire book as it then stood off to the terrific writer Yoon Ha Lee.

And then, at the end of June, I was accepted to VP.

This is a really big deal for me. Viable Paradise only takes 24 students. It’s an intense, one-week workshop, and the instructors are some of the best authors and editors in SF/F today. People who apply often get wait-listed and have to re-apply the next year. Alumni include award-winning and best-selling authors.

Now, there’s no guarantee I’ll ever become one of those. There’s no guarantee I’ll even be published (traditionally, anyway). But no matter what I’m going to learn a huge amount. I’m learning lots already from my interactions with my classmates as we get to know each other ahead of the workshop.

Then Yoon sent his critique of “The Frozen Past” back right before my surgery, and it included words I was really happy to see: “There’s nothing here that can’t be fixed in revision.” The book is probably going to need a lot more restructuring and rewriting than I’d thought, and there’s some problematic characterization at points which needs addressing. But the last third seems to really work – which is feedback I’ve gotten from everyone who has read it – and the rest can be fixed. But not until after VP.

So what’s next? I wish I was more of a short fiction writer, but I seem to be stuck in book mode. I’ve spent the last part of July and first half of August working on the plot for my second book, which straddles the line between stand-alone and sequel to TFP. I seem to be on-target to start writing the first draft by the end of August.

And we’ll see what happens.